Contact
Name
Pavel Demin

Position
Research scientist
Funding: UCL-cadre - UCL

Email
pavel.demin@uclouvain.be

Address
Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology - CP3
Université catholique de Louvain
2, Chemin du Cyclotron - Box L7.01.05
B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve
Belgium

Phone
+32 10 47 3165

Office
E.355

UCL member card
http://www.uclouvain.be/pavel.demin
Projects
Research directions:
Phenomenology of elementary particles
Data analysis in HEP experiments
Detector commissioning, operation and data processing
Research and development of new detectors

Experiments and collaborations:
CMS
NA62

Active projects
a C++ software package to compute Matrix Element weights: MoMEMta
Florian Bury, Jérôme de Favereau, Christophe Delaere, Pavel Demin, Vincent Lemaitre, Alessia Saggio

MoMEMta is a C++ software package to compute Matrix Element weights. Designed in a modular way, it covers the needs of experimental analysis workflows at the LHC. MoMEMta provides working examples for the most common final states (Formula: 0, WW, ...). If you are an expert user, be prepared to feel the freedom of configuring your MEM computation at all levels.
MoMEMta is based on:

- C++, ROOT, Lua scripting language
- Cuba (Monte-Carlo integration library)
- External PDFs (LHAPDF by default)
- External Matrix Elements (currently provided by our MadGraph C++ exporter plugin)
Development of a framework for fast simulation of a generic collider experiment: Delphes
Jérôme de Favereau, Christophe Delaere, Pavel Demin, Andrea Giammanco, Vincent Lemaitre

Observability of new phenomenological models in High Energy experiments is delicate to evaluate, due to the complexity of the related detectors, DAQ chain and software. Delphes is a new framework for fast simulation of a general purpose experiment. The simulation includes a tracking system, a magnetic field, calorimetry and a muon system, and possible very forward detectors arranged along the beamline. The framework is interfaced to standard file format from event generators and outputs observable analysis data objects. The simulation takes into account the detector resolutions, usual reconstruction algorithms for complex objects (FastJet) and a simplified trigger emulation. Detection of very forward scattered particles relies on the transport in beamlines with the Hector software.
Imaging with cosmic-ray muons
Samip Basnet, Eduardo Cortina Gil, Pavel Demin, Andrea Giammanco, Sophie Wuyckens

The general goal of this project is to develop muon-based radiography or tomography (“muography”), an innovative multidisciplinary approach to study large-scale natural or man-made structures, establishing a strong synergy between particle physics and other disciplines, such as geology and archaeology.
Muography is an imaging technique that relies on the measurement of the absorption of muons produced by the interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere.
Applications span from geophysics (the study of the interior of mountains and the remote quasi-online monitoring of active volcanoes) to archaeology and mining.

We are part of the EU-funded H2020 network INTENSE where we coordinate the Muography work package, which brings together particle physicists, geophysicists, archaeologists, civil engineers and private companies for the development and exploitation of this imaging method.

We are using the local facilities at CP3 for the development of high-resolution portable detectors.
We also participate to the MURAVES collaboration, now merged into the MIVAS collaboration, through algorithmic and data-analysis aspects like the implementation of time-of-flight capabilities, the analysis of control data for the optimization of the reconstruction algorithms, and the understanding of physics and instrumental backgrounds by data-driven and simulation techniques.

External collaborators: UGent; INTENSE Research & Innovation Staff Exchange network (Japan, Switzerland, Italy, France, Hungary); MIVAS Collaboration (France and Italy) including CNRS (France), INFN (Italy), INGV(Italy).
NA62 computing
Eduardo Cortina Gil, Pavel Demin, Plamen Petrov

NA62 will look for rare kaon decays at SPS accelerator at CERN. A total of about $10^{12}$ kaon decays will be produced in two/three years of data taking. Even though the topology of the events is relatively simple, and the amount of information per event small, the volume of data to be stored per year will be of the order of ~1000 TB. Also, an amount of 500 TB/year is expected from simulation.

Profiting from the synergy inside CP3 in sharing computer resources our group is participating in the definition of the NA62 computing scheme. CP3 will be also one of the grid virtual organization of the experiment.

External collaborators: INFN (Rome I), University of Birmingham, University of Glasgow.
The CMS silicon strip tracker upgrade
Giacomo Bruno, Florian Bury, Eduardo Cortina Gil, Jérôme de Favereau, Christophe Delaere, Martin Delcourt, Pavel Demin, Suat Donertas, Khawla Jaffel, Vincent Lemaitre, Maksym Teklishyn

Development of the "phase II" upgrade for the CMS silicon strip stracker.

More precisely, we are involved in the development of the uTCA-based DAQ system and in the test/validation of the first prototype modules. We take active part to the various test-beam campaigns (CERN, DESY, ...)

This activity will potentially make use of the cyclotron of UCL, the probe stations and the SYCOC setup (SYstem de mesure de COllection de Charge) to test the response to laser light, radioactive sources and beams.

The final goal is to take a leading role in the construction of part of the CMS Phase-II tracker.

External collaborators: CRC and CMS collaboration.
World LHC Computing Grid: the Belgian Tier2 project
Giacomo Bruno, Jérôme de Favereau, Pavel Demin, Vincent Lemaitre, Andres Tanasijczuk

The World LHC Computing GRID (WLCG) is the worldwide distributed computing infrastructure controlled by software middleware that allows a seamless usage of shared storage and computing resources.

About 10 PBytes of data are produced every year by the experiments running at the LHC collider. This data must be processed (iterative and refined calibration and analysis) by a large scientific community that is widely distributed geographically.

Instead of concentrating all necessary computing resources in a single location, the LHC experiments have decided to set-up a network of computing centres distributed all over the world.

The overall WLCG computing resources needed by the CMS experiment alone in 2016 amount to about 1500 kHepSpec06 of computing power, 90 PB of disk storage and 150 PB of tape storage. Working in the context of the WLCG translates into seamless access to shared computing and storage resources. End users do not need to know where their applications run. The choice is made by the underlying WLCG software on the basis of availability of resources, demands of the user application (CPU, input and output data,..) and privileges owned by the user.

Back in 2005 UCL proposed the WLCG Belgian Tier2 project that would involve the 6 Belgian Universities involved in CMS. The Tier2 project consists of contributing to the WLCG by building two computing centres, one at UCL and one at the IIHE (ULB/VUB).

The UCL site of the WLCG Belgian Tier2 is deployed in a dedicated room close to the cyclotron control room of the IRMP Institute and is currently a fully functional component of the WLCG.

The UCL Belgian Tier2 project also aims to integrate, bring on the GRID, and share resources with other scientific computing projects. The projects currently integrated in the UCL computing cluster are the following: MadGraph/MadEvent, NA62 and Cosmology.

External collaborators: CISM (UCL), Pascal Vanlaer (Belgium, ULB), Lyon computing centre, CERN computing centre.

Non-active projects
Publications in CP3
All my publications on Inspire

Number of publications as CP3 member: 8 Download BibTeX

Last 5 publications

2018

CP3-18-36: A portable muon telescope based on small and gas-tight Resistive Plate Chambers
Wuyckens, Sophie and Giammanco, Andrea and Demin, Pavel and Cortina Gil, Eduardo

[Abstract] [PDF] [Journal] [Dial]
Proceedings of the "Cosmic-Ray Muography" meeting of the Royal Society, 14-15 May 2018 at the Kavli Royal Society Centre, Chicheley Hall, Newport Pagnell (UK).
Refereed paper. Contribution to proceedings. June 18.

2013

CP3-13-32: DELPHES 3, A modular framework for fast simulation of a generic collider experiment
de Favereau, J. and others

[Abstract] [PDF] [Journal] [Dial]
Published in JHEP
Refereed paper. July 25.

2010

CP3-10-40: CMS Tracking Performance Results from early LHC Operation
CMS collaboration

[Abstract] [PDF] [Journal] [Dial] [Full text]
Published in Eur.Phys.J.C70:1165-1192,2010.
Refereed paper. December 21.

2009

CP3-09-58: Alignment of the CMS Silicon Tracker during Commissioning with Cosmic Rays
CMS Collaboration

[Abstract] [PDF] [Journal] [Dial] [Full text]
CMS PAPER CFT-09-003
Published in JINST
Refereed paper. December 26.
CP3-09-57: Commissioning and Performance of the CMS Pixel Tracker with Cosmic Ray Muons
CMS Collaboration

[Abstract] [PDF] [Journal] [Dial] [Full text]
CMS-CFT-09-001.
Published in JINST
Refereed paper. December 26.

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